Researchers find why depression and ageing linked to increased disease risk

value= This page was printed from: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/284100.php Visit www.medicalnewstoday.com for medical news & health news headlines posted all through the day, every day. © 2004-2014 All rights reserved. MNT is the registered trade mark of MediLexicon International Restricted. SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

Ebola: Resist the tendency to over-react

value= While driving to work, I listened to Mike and Mike (a radio sports speak show). Mike Greenberg made a marvelous point about his job. He outlined what they do as “professional over-reactors.” They take every game & extrapolate, more often than not irrationally, about the implications of that game. Does this remind you of wellness reporting? A study appears in a serious medical journal, plus the press “blows it up” as the next excellent advance. Yet scientific understanding grows slowly, with fits & begins. Too frequently initial study reports aren’t confirmed with later studies. While this really is a considerable challenge, perhaps a bigger challenge occurs when a new illness or epidemic occurs. Loads of opine seriously and profess to have the answers. A lot of use the retrospectoscope to criticize public health, or individual physicians or other well being care workers. Generally the critiques of the situation take a serious health issue and use it to highlight an concern that they want to espouse. Likely I am guilty of this tendency. I wrote lately concerning the emergency department missing the 1st Ebola patient’s diagnosis to highlight my concern about diagnostic accuracy. Others have used this unfortunate story to highlight complications about electronic wellness records. We use anecdotes to highlight our concerns. Potentially we overreact. However our concerns pale compared to political candidates. We now have the Republicans blaming the Democrats and vice versa for the Ebola epidemic. Balderdash! Neither side makes a convincing case, and they have each stooped to using a public well being crisis to make political hay. As we work to understand the Ebola epidemic, we have a responsibility to not over-react. We should let the public well being pro’s and the infectious disease experts carefully examine the information. Our over-reacting just leads to hysteria. To be sure the press will continue to over-react and politicians will over-react, and bloggers will over-react. That is what we do. Though are we helping anyone? Are we just fueling hysteria? What do you think? Robert Centor is an internal medication physician who blogs at DB’s Medical Rants. SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

gallifreyan-detective:

Requested by Anon.

value= gallifreyan-detective: Requested by Anon. PERMALINK 2,216 notes  |   #dw spoilers   #series 8   #8.09   #flatline   #twelfth doctor   #rigsy   #maybe rigsy goes on to paint the next mona lisa   #who knows   #we’d like to think so   strivingforsunshine reblogged this from doctorwho gummywormbow likes this sillierthanasillylaugh likes this doomsdave96 reblogged this from doctorwho epsilonyx reblogged this from doctorwho afuckingcurtain likes this koule18 reblogged this from doctorwho rainbows-andblowjobs likes this pete-wentz-is-cuter-then-you likes this hannahinspace reblogged this from doctorwho amessitgrows reblogged this from doctorwho but-its-larger-on-the-inside reblogged this from theyogcave but-its-bigger-on-the-inside likes this aiiroshinju reblogged this from decently-thinking of-ghosts mjthepokegeek likes this thejollywriter likes this goodbyegallifrey reblogged this from gotmywandandmytardis krusso likes this probzmartinez likes this kingofthenerdsss reblogged this from doctorwho ashestostars reblogged this from doctorwho ashestostars likes this loudsextohalloweenmusic likes this trent13ulrich likes this chanceydoesstuff likes this twat-by-name-twat-by-nature reblogged this from doctorwho gingertimelord712 reblogged this from doctorwho nissapreternatural likes this madaboutfangirling likes this himarina reblogged this from doctorwho smiletheway reblogged this from doctorwho smiletheway likes this bailesu likes this haha-leigh likes this ishouldprobablysleep reblogged this from doctorwho elmanie reblogged this from umm-just-one other-timelord andrewakening likes this brealeylou likes this whovianmouse likes this lovanerd likes this impalatardisof221bcamelot likes this nogamenotitans reblogged this from sublimesubpumpkin omgallthingsme likes this nogamenotitans likes this mastertimethief likes this mygoodtimelord likes this zanyafritjof reblogged this from ireadhpinenochian wizardsoftrenzalore likes this zanyafritjof likes this onlysaysficus likes this Show more notesLoading… Archive DOCTORWHO.TUMBLR.COM/ARCHIVE In the event you ARE NEW TO WHO, Go look at these posts. Wondering WHERE TO WATCH? Look into our guide. DoctorWho BBCA SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

Did Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Man Walk?

value= By Peter Russell WebMD Well being News Reviewed by Keith Barnard, MD Oct. 21, 2014 – A group of doctors & scientists say a paralyzed man has been able to walk once again after surgery in which nerve cells from his nasal cavity were transplanted into his spinal cord. Darek Fidyka, a 38-year-old Bulgarian who was left paralyzed from the chest down when he was stabbed in an attack in 2010, is now in a position to walk once again working with a frame, and he’s regained feeling in his legs, doctors say. Although many pro’s warn that the medical evidence is far from conclusive, and it would be wrong to give incorrect hope to individuals expecting a remedy for paralysis. Reported Details The surgery was done in Poland in partnership with scientists led by Dr. Geoffrey Raisman, a professor at the Spinal Repair Unit at UCL Institute of Neurology in London. Treating folks with a complete spinal cord injury has commonly been unsuccessful, due to the fact no methods exist to regenerate severed spinal nerves across the injured vicinity. Now physicians & scientists say they have been able to restore some lower limb function & a few sensation by transplanting what are known as olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) from the patient’s nose. These cells send the sense of smell from the nasal lining to the brain. The patient’s own OECs were transplanted into his spinal cord, plus a “nerve bridge” making use of several lower limb nerves was built between two stumps of the damaged spinal column. Previous studies with animals recommend OECs have excellent regeneration powers, while constructing nerve bridges is a time-honored surgical process. But the two strategies hadn’t been used together before. Particulars of the treatment have been published in the journal Cell Transplantation & will be featured in a BBC Panorama program. A Breakthrough? Dr. Pawel Tabakow of the Wroclaw Medical School in Poland says in a statement: “Previous to the transplantation, we estimated that without this treatment, our patient’s recovery chances were less than 1%. On the other hand, we observed a gradual recovery of each sensory and motor function that began 4 months after the surgery.” Raisman says in a statement: “We think that this process is the breakthrough which — as it is further developed — will result in a historic change in the presently hopeless outlook for men and women disabled by spinal cord injury. “We are currently raising the funds to mount an Anglo-Polish initiative to verify the advantages of this procedure with further patients.” 2nd Opinion Nonetheless, the findings have not convinced quite a few experts that this is a major breakthrough for men and women with paralysis. Commenting in a statement, Dr. Simone Di Giovanni, chair in Restorative Neuroscience for Imperial University London, says that one case of improvement “cannot represent any solid scientific evidence to elaborate upon. In truth, there is no evidence that the transplant is responsible for the reported neurological improvement. SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

EPISODE PREVIEW: In The Forest Of The Night [spoiler-free]

value= IN THE FOREST OF THE NIGHT by Frank Cottrell-Boyce Starring: Peter Capaldi, Jenna Coleman & Samuel Anderson Airs Oct 25 Assessment by Cameron K McEwan It’s not generally we get an episode with a brand new writer And director and however Doctor Who Series 8 has already seen 1, & now here’s a different. This mixture of “newness”, if you will permit to use that word, just shows how exciting and invigorating an input of fresh voices and visions could be. In The Forest Of The Night wastes no time in setting the scene – the world has been taken over by the trees (and vegetation in general). The Doctor is somewhat flummoxed by the turn of events, & even more perplexed by the appearance of Coal Hill College pupil Maebh who doesn’t seem to be too taken aback by the TARDIS. And the surprise-o-meter is blasted apart when Clara, Danny and more pupils find a new forest world in front of them after a Museum sleepover. But why has the Earth been embroidered with greenery, & why is young Maebh so important to discovering this mystery? There’s more, much more to take in, but I shan’t spoil. From the opening of this episode, it is incredibly clear that In The Forest Of The Night is going to be something extremely exclusive & exceptionally special. Young Maebh’s meeting with everyone’s preferred Gallifreyan in the TARDIS is fun & fascinating however it’s how these moments are filmed that honestly catch the eye. New-to-Who director Sheree Folkson is not scared to get all hand-held and up in people’s faces; stylistically, this kind of camerawork has been a stranger to Doctor Who. It is a most welcome addition. Inititially, this quirk emphasises the lighter side of the episode but, as the darker elements of the story develops, plus the mystery can become clearer, the camera gives weight to the fear and the danger. Folkson is to be congratulated for her vision & her boldness. A boldness which 1 feels, came from the spirit and heart of the script. Speaking of which, the other newbie (however hardly new to the world of television & film), Frank Cottrell-Boyce has done, what I refer to as, a “Richard Curtis”. Older readers could remember Vincent and the Doctor from the Four Weddings along with a Funeral writer – a beautiful, brave and touching story, with a message deep in its core. Well, Cottrell-Boyce has mirrored this. On the surface, Forest is a story concerning the world being taken over by trees while the human race face obliteration. And, I’m positive, that will be adequate for a number of viewers. However there is so way more going on, rumbling beneath (not particularly far, I ought to say) from the top. Once more, without wanting to spoil, Maebh’s story is heartbreaking at times, joyous at others; “I haven’t phoned home, but I know my mum is worried about me,” she stoutly informs The Physician, who merely looks on, speechless bested by the wisdom of his new companion. How we treat children affected adversely by the world around them is examined in quite a moving fashion and, I must admit, this tale could well evoke tears from its audience (well, those with a heart anyway). For me, it’s the very first time this series when I have felt so touched by the story & characters involved. In tandem, there is also ecological themes being addressed and one cannot help although be reminded of 1970s Doctor Who when each week the social politics of the British Isles were being dissected. Here, still, it is on a international scale and, as with the other troubles, sensitively & prudently handled. Like the aforementioned director, Frank Cottrell-Boyce is also to be congratulated enormously for his mightily extraordinary debut. As emotional as the episode is, there is nonetheless a bucket-load of adventure in here – “Stars grow cold, planets implode. Catastrophe is the metabolism of the universe!” proclaims Peter Capaldi on the realisation that this battle could already be over, adding, “I can fight monsters, I cannot fight physics.” Fantastic lines & delivered in quite a Doctorly fashion. The Scotsman’s interplay with Maebh, perfectly played by Abigail Eames, is utterly delightful. Like with Courtney earlier this series in The Caretaker and Kill The Moon, Capaldi shows his Time Lord can spark off with the most unlikely of people. Seeing him with Coal Hill’s so-called “gifted & talented” is a joy; his child-awareness amusing in the extreme. A specific standout from the young people is the amazing Harley Bird, who plays know-it-all but forever worrying & panicy Ruby. In a line reminiscent of Lisa Simpson’s MTV generation comment, “We feel neither highs or lows,” Ruby says of the new world they find themselves in, “There was a forest, there wasn’t a forest – nothing surprises us any more.” Pfft, children today, huh? Elsewhere in the story, we get a glimpse into the increasingly emotionally scaterred pysche of Clara. Subsequent to The Physician she might seem common, nevertheless when you place her next to Danny,  a very human & caring person, we start to see how her outlook on life has been changed and how her priorities are vastly distinct to her fellow teacher. It is a stark reminder how diverse she is to your common Earthling. In The Forest Of The Night could well feel and look like a fairytale nonetheless it’s something though. It is firmly grounded in reality and genuine issues. The kids involved are a smoke screen for themes which the mature audience will savour and ponder whilst the mystery and its fantastic resolution will keep you hooked and satisfy greatly. And your heart may just beat a insignificant stronger too. In The Forest Of The Night airs 8.20pm, Oct 25 on BBC One Thanks to the BBC SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

honey-thyme marinated sharp cheddar

value= On our early-morning flight home from DC last week, I was far too exhausted to read the book I planned on reading (I’m currently reading Steve Work), so I picked up the November issue of the Food Network Magazine. (Getting magazines at the airport is most certainly a guilty pleasure of mine!) & in between short sleeps on that cross-country flight, I paged by means of the magazine, ripping out the recipes I need to try. I love the range that comes in a magazine like Food Network. I presently only subscribe to two food magazines: Bon Appétit, which is excellent for more modern, upscale recipes and I just re-subscribed to Rachael Ray Magazine, which is awesome for simpler, family-friendly meals. Generally times, I like to merge the 2 styles into my own cooking style. Given that the Food Network is my preferred tv channel, I frequently get pleasure from the magazine from time to time. (Food Network side note: I honestly miss Rachael Ray’s cooking shows.) Although the cheese! This marinated cheese recipe in the magazine caught my eye, right away! I used to purchase marinated feta All of the time (it is remarkable on salads) and any recipe with cheese as the star…well, it is bound to catch my eye. In this recipe, sharp cheddar cheese is marinated with olive oil, honey, thyme, smashed garlic clove & red pepper flakes. It’s a bit sweet plus a bit hot with a hint of garlic and so much better than sharp cheddar on it’s own. It is perfect for snacking straight out of the bowl, or as an accompaniment to crackers, to be sure! Conventionally, cheese plates include a sweet & spicy component – here, it’s all combined! I have a feeling it will grow to be your new preferred appetizer. Bring it to every party, serve it at every party. You can not go inaccurate with this easy crowd-pleaser! Serving suggestion: remove the garlic before serving so no 1 accidentally thinks its cheese…it happened. Honey-Thyme Marinated Sharp Cheddar Author: Emily Dingmann (adapted from Food Network Magazine) Prep time: 5 mins Total time: 5 mins Serves: eight servings Ingredients 8 oz block of sharp cheddar cheese 1/two cup olive oil two Tbsp honey 2 cloves garlic, smashed 4-6 sprigs of thyme red pepper flakes salt Directions Cut up cheddar into nominal squares. (Little adequate to eat in 1 bite!) Incorporate remaining ingredients in nominal bowl (red pepper flakes quantity depends on how much heat you need!) & toss with cheese. Marinate at room temperature for at least a half hour, or make ahead & marinate overnight in the refrigerator if doable. Notes The flavors get more intense over time, so if it’s finest to make a day or two in advance! 3.2.2807 Search by Category Pick Categoryappetizersavocadobaconbeansbeefbreakfastcheesechickenchocolatecocktailscoconutdessertdinnereggsfruitgluten-freehigh-fiberhigh-proteinlunchmeatnutsolivespaleo-friendlypastasaladseafoodsnacksoupUncategorizedveganvegetablesvegetarianwhole grains By Date Pick MonthOctober 2014September 2014August 2014July 2014June 2014May 2014April 2014March 2014February 2014January 2014December 2013November 2013October 2013September 2013August 2013July 2013June 2013May 2013April 2013March 2013February 2013January 2013December 2012November 2012October 2012September 2012August 2012July 2012June 2012May 2012April 2012March 2012February 2012January 2012December 2011November 2011October 2011September 2011August 2011July 2011June 2011May 2011April 2011March 2011February 2011January 2011December 2010November 2010October 2010September 2010August 2010July 2010June 2010May 2010April 2010March 2010February 2010January 2010December 2009November 2009October 2009September 2009August 2009July 2009June 2009May 2009April 2009March 2009 SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

Gareth Roberts no longer writing City of Death book

value= Author & scriptwriter Gareth Roberts, writer of quite a few Doctor Who books & scripts over the past 20 years, has this evening announced on Twitter that he is no longer working on a novelisation of the 1979 Doctor Who serial City of Death, the most-watched story in the programme’s history. Instead, the book will now be written by author and former BBC Doctor Who website editor James Goss. Goss’s prior work incorporates the Torchwood novel In essence Perfect and the Tenth Physician audio book Dead Air. He also worked as producer of the animated Doctor Who serials Scream of the Shalka and The Infinite Quest. City of Death was originally scripted by producer Graham Williams & script editor Douglas Adams, from a story thought by David Fisher. Transmitted below the pseudonym of “David Agnew”, the story gained over 16 million viewers in the autumn of 1979, yet like Adams’s other scripts for Physician Who, rights troubles meant that – unlike the majority of classic series stories – a novelisation was never produced under the original Target Books run. In October last year it was announced that Roberts would finally be penning a novelisation of City of Death, following the success of his novelisation of Adams’ scripts for the unfinished serial Shada in 2012. Roberts had develop into especially known for his affinity with the Season 17 era of Doctor Who during the mid-1990s, when he penned three well-received books set all through that season for Virgin Publishing’s Missing Adventures range of original Doctor Who novels. Two of Roberts’ Missing Adventures for the Season 17 TARDIS team are at the moment being adapted into audio plays by Major Finish productions. Roberts’s novelisation of City of Death had originally been expected to be released this year – there is right now no facts on when Goss’s eventual version of the book might be on the shelves. SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

Wearable tech must get smart with data

value= For wearable technology to live up to the hype, in particular when it comes to healthcare, it will are obliged to be “interoperable, integrated, engaging, social and outcomes-driven,” according to PwC. [See also: Wearable device industry in growth mode] One in 5 American grown-ups already own a wearable device, in accordance with PwC’s new series, “The Wearable Future,” a rapid adoption rate that is only expected to increase. However in a related report from PwC’s Health Analysis Institute, “Health wearables: Early days,” data suggests a good deal of of the fitness bands and step-tracking smartwatches flooding the marketplace have “under-delivered on expectations.” To wit: 33 percent of buyers who purchased a wearable technology device more than a year ago now say they no longer use it, or do so infrequently. [See also: PwC survey: 3 in 10 Americans would track PHI with their phones ] For those yet to acquire into the wearables craze, price, privacy, security and the lack of “actionable” & inconsistent information from such devices are typical concerns, according to PwC: 82 % of respondents were worried that wearable tech would invade their privacy, & 86 % expressed concern that wearables would make them more vulnerable to security breaches. Still, wearable technology will gain traction over the next 5 to 10 years, in accordance with the study, with awesome promise to help purchasers better manage their well being and healthcare expenses. However PwC suggests the potential of the $2.eight trillion U.S. healthcare system will only be recognized if corporations are in a position to turn data into insights leading to better health. “For wearables to help shape the New Health Economy, subsequent generation devices will need to be interoperable, integrated, engaging, social and outcomes-driven,” stated Vaughn Kauffman, principal of PwC Wellness Industries, in a statement. “Wearable details could be used by insurers & employers to better manage health, wellness and healthcare costs, by pharmaceutical and life sciences corporations to run more robust clinical trials, & by healthcare providers to capture info to support outcomes-based reimbursement,” he added. “However it will be key to address the consumer difficulties that we have identified, such as charge, privacy & ease of use.” Among the fascinating findings of PwC’s polling: clients don’t need to pay much for their wearable devices; they want to be paid to use them. More than two-thirds (68 %) of buyers say they would wear employer-provided wearables streaming anonymous data to an details pool in exchange for break on their insurance premiums. Besides payers, providers might also have an inroad to help spur wider adoption, as respondents say they’d be especially willing to try wearable tech provided by their primary care physician. Citing concerns about privacy, prospects trust their docs most with their health data. SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl

Did Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Man Walk?

value= By Peter Russell WebMD Wellness News Reviewed by Keith Barnard, MD Oct. 21, 2014 – A group of doctors and scientists say a paralyzed man has been in a position to walk once more after surgery in which nerve cells from his nasal cavity were transplanted into his spinal cord. Darek Fidyka, a 38-year-old Bulgarian who was left paralyzed from the chest down when he was stabbed in an attack in 2010, is now able to walk once more working with a frame, & he’s regained feeling in his legs, physicians say. Yet quite a few experts warn that the medical evidence is far from conclusive, and it would be inaccurate to give false hope to folks expecting a cure for paralysis. Reported Details The surgery was done in Poland in partnership with scientists led by Dr. Geoffrey Raisman, a professor at the Spinal Repair Unit at UCL Institute of Neurology in London. Treating people with a complete spinal cord injury has in the main been unproductive, because no strategies exist to regenerate severed spinal nerves across the injured vicinity. Now doctors & scientists say they have been in a position to restore several lower limb function & quite a few sensation by transplanting what are known as olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) from the patient’s nose. These cells send the sense of smell from the nasal lining to the brain. The patient’s own OECs were transplanted into his spinal cord, and a “nerve bridge” working with many lower limb nerves was built between 2 stumps of the damaged spinal column. Preceding studies with animals suggest OECs have good regeneration powers, while constructing nerve bridges is a time-honored surgical procedure. But the 2 tactics hadn’t been used together before. Details of the treatment have already been published in the journal Cell Transplantation & will be featured in a BBC Panorama program. A Breakthrough? Dr. Pawel Tabakow of the Wroclaw Medical University in Poland says in a statement: “Earlier to the transplantation, we estimated that without this treatment, our patient’s recovery chances were less than 1%. Nevertheless, we observed a gradual recovery of both sensory and motor function that began 4 months after the surgery.” Raisman says in a statement: “We think that this procedure is the breakthrough which — as it is further developed — will result in a historic change in the at the moment hopeless outlook for people disabled by spinal cord injury. “We’re presently raising the funds to mount an Anglo-Polish initiative to verify the advantages of this strategy with further patients.” Second Opinion Still, the findings have not convinced some experts that this is a major breakthrough for men and women with paralysis. Commenting in a statement, Dr. Simone Di Giovanni, chair in Restorative Neuroscience for Imperial School London, says that 1 case of improvement “can not represent any solid scientific evidence to elaborate upon. In truth, there is no evidence that the transplant is responsible for the reported neurological improvement. SyndContentImpl.interface=interface com.sun.syndication.feed.synd.SyndContent SyndContentImpl.type=text/html SyndContentImpl